Wednesday, April 23, 2014

A trip to the farm



Author Emily Thomson takes children on a lovely trip to the farm filled with interesting sights. An interactive book, it is a fun one to read out loud to a toddler so they can make animal sounds as well. Primary colored illustrations wake up the pages and adorable, cuddly animals brighten them even more. She does the traditional farm animals, but makes sure to include new interesting ones, like a llama as well. Pretty, inviting, and engaging, it is a perfect book for the very young.

Happy Reading!
Carole P. Roman

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Timeless story



Though Lynn Steward's debut book A Very Good Life takes place in the 1970 in New York City, it has a kind of timelessness to it. Dana McGarry is an "it" girl. She lives a privileged lifestyle of a well heeled public relations manager in a high end department store. With a storybook husband and a fairy tale life filled with society parties, change comes swiftly and unexpectedly. Cracks begin to appear in the perfect facade. Challenged with an ethical problem at work and the growing awareness that her relationship with her distant husband is strained, Dana must deal with the unwanted changes in her life. Can she find her place in the new world where women can have a voice, or will she allow herself to be manipulated into doing things that go against her growing self confidence? Lynn Steward creates a beautiful slice of New York's bustling holiday life, filled with rich imagery.

Happy Reading!
Carole P. Roman

Friday, April 18, 2014

Can you guess?



Hilarious book about a group of animals grazing in a pasture. One of them finds something and asks the others to come over and guess what it is. Adorable pictures, filled with funny suggestions will have both reader and child shouting out suggestions. I will not give the ending away, but it could be a fun riddle to tease young brains. A quick, fun read, to be savored with a child, and may I add, the sillier you read it, the more enjoyable it will be.

Happy Reading!
Carole P. Roman

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Perfect marriage of beautiful artwork and fun filled verse



Beautifully illustrated trip to the moon made fun by absurd tongue twisting verse that will leave both old and young delightfully entertained. Reminiscent of Dr. Seuss, the authors have written similar type stanzas that create a climate of silliness. Funny animals match the refrains of hilarious situations. Certainly this book is a perfect addition to any child's library.

Happy Reading!
Carole P. Roman

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Fish Tale with a nice hook



Joey and the Net is a beautifully illustrated story about a Mama fish and her baby tilapia. Like most big broods, or in this case schools, she has one offspring who swims against the current. This is both frustrating and scary for the mama. It all resolves itself in a Disneyesque type ending with Joey showing how his independent spirit saves the day. Great conversation starter on independent thought, when it is appropriate and when it can be dangerous. I found the details about the fish Tilapia very interesting in the front of the book.

Happy Reading!
Carole P. Roman

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Pretty book that explores cities around the globe



Lovely renditions of a variety countries that invite children to explore and discover the many differences we enjoy. Beautifully illustrated, each page is a cornucopia of colors and subjects with interesting flaps making it interactive. A small poem accompanies each city. I wish there was more information per page, like flaps with small facts to pique young minds. A pretty book, with great potential to open discussions about the world and the people who live on it.

Happy Reading!
Carole P. Roman

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Great beginners biography



While I found the bubbles of the side comments made by the characters distracting, I did like the premise of this book. Humanizing larger than life characters makes it easier for children to relate to them. Meltzer picks themes that children can identify with so Abraham Lincoln ceases being the "guy on the penny", and his actions of fighting for what one believes in becomes understandable. In a few scenarios, Meltzer retells stories supposedly from Lincoln's own experiences that explains how his ideals were developed. He takes relatable situations like bullying, really caring about his education, and seeing that slavery was morally wrong to introduce the children to the type of things Lincoln stood for and couple them with moving quotes from his speeches. Later, snapshots like a scrap book are put in so children can recognize the real man from the cartoon. I liked this book and think it's a great way to introduce young children to the awesome figures in history, making them pint sized for young minds to grasp their importance.

Happy Reading!
Carole P. Roman